rightside-vector2
rightside-vector2
Study

Palliative Care Nursing Programs in Canada: Better quality of life for all Canadians

January 18, 2018

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Palliative Care as defined by World Health Organization or WHO, is an approach that improves the quality of life of not only the patients with critical illnesses but also their families who care for them. This is done through the prevention and relief of suffering using early identification, impeccable assessment and, treatment of pain and other problems which might be physical and psychological. It aims at relieving any suffering caused by a serious ailment, resulting in extreme discomfort to the patient.

According to a research published by WHO, only 14% of the people who require palliative care worldwide actually receive it. World Health Assembly resolution emphasized the need to create national palliative care policies, to ensure training for all health care staff in the palliative care, and also the integration of palliative care services into existing health care systems.

According to the 2012 fact sheet of Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association or CHPCA, only 16% to 30% of Canadians who die currently receive or have access to palliative services, be it at home or at health care centers. The leading causes of death in Canada are mainly diseases of the circulatory system which are about 35%, tumors or cancers which are about 28%, and disorders of the respiratory system, which are about 10%. It was in 2004 that Statistics Canada projected the death rate in Canada to rise by 33% by the year 2020 amounting to more than 330,000 deaths per year. Palliative care programs and services are beneficial to every group, which is approximately 73% of all Canadian deaths. Palliative care programs allow patients to gain more control over their lives, manage symptoms and pain more efficiently, and also provides support to family and informal caregivers.

According to a research published by WHO, only 14% of the people who require palliative care worldwide actually receive it. World Health Assembly resolution emphasized the need to create national palliative care policies, to ensure training for all health care staff in the palliative care, and also the integration of palliative care services into existing health care systems.

According to the 2012 fact sheet of Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association or CHPCA, only 16% to 30% of Canadians who die currently receive or have access to palliative services, be it at home or at health care centers. The leading causes of death in Canada are mainly diseases of the circulatory system which are about 35%, tumors or cancers which are about 28%, and disorders of the respiratory system, which are about 10%. It was in 2004 that Statistics Canada projected the death rate in Canada to rise by 33% by the year 2020 amounting to more than 330,000 deaths per year. Palliative care programs and services are beneficial to every group, which is approximately 73% of all Canadian deaths. Palliative care programs allow patients to gain more control over their lives, manage symptoms and pain more efficiently, and also provides support to family and informal caregivers.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

rightside-vector6

Related Blogs

×